First ever disability culture zine debuts

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Disability Culture Zine is an online zine created by and for the community of young people with disabilities. It is a project of the National Youth Leadership Network  which aspires to build bridges to unite and empower young people with disabilities.

A  black and white phote of someone in a wheelchair holding hands with someone running and going down street with the acronym NYLN

The first of a number of issues has been published and it is a collection of submissions from poets, artists, and creative writers – all sources of  inspiration.  One example of content comes from a short essay written by Emily Holmes, a humorous excerpt from What is Disability Culture?

“Disability culture is absorbed with humor that is good for the soul. Here is an example. I have Tourette’s Syndrome so I make strange and random noises and movements that I cannot control. There are times when I wonder why my brain chose the noises and movements that I make. Of all the thousands of options out there one noise that my brain chose is Mama Mia. Yes, I say these two words randomly for no reason at anytime of the day. There are lots of other words and noises my brain could have picked but this is what it came up with and I think it is very funny.”

Another example of content is the visual imagery by Charlie Hughes called Don’t Pet Me, this is a colorful  image of a wolf like creature in a power wheel chair next to a person standing.  The person who is standing is petting the wolf like creature. Floating above the both of them, at the top of the image, is a thought bubble, and in the thought bubble is an image of the wolf like creature biting the person’s hand.

The NYLN Disability Culture Zine curates the work that is submitted to provide a gallery style platform of thought provoking and inspiring work that is a representational characteristic of the variety of individuals that make up the community of people with disabilities.

We encourage you to check out this zine,  If you find this project worthy, NYLN accepts donations on its website.