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Rooted in Rights

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How Can Universities Better Support Disabled Students to Graduate?

Monday, June 26, 2017

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and Titles II and III of the Americans with Disabilities Act are all intended to help disabled people successfully receive an education. As a result, far more disabled people are going to and graduating from college. 11% of postsecondary students are

I Had a Kidney Transplant, and the AHCA Would Cause Me Significant Financial Troubles

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Almost three years ago, I had a kidney transplant that saved my life after living with chronic kidney disease for 35 years. The American Health Care Act (AHCA), which was just passed by the House and is going to move on to the Senate, includes organ transplants on the list of pre-existing conditions. The list

Reflecting on the Impact of #DisabilityTooWhite

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

It’s been just over a year since activist and Rooted in Rights’ new Digital Manager, Vilissa Thompson, created #DisabilityTooWhite (the hashtag turned a year old on May 18), and started meaningful conversations about race and intersectionality in the disability community. Vilissa started the hashtag as a reaction to an xoJane article about beauty and disability

Dealing with Medical Ableism

Friday, June 9, 2017

I have a tracheostomy and use a ventilator to breathe at night. It works well for me, and I have no regrets, but every couple of years, I wind up in the hospital with some kind of upper respiratory infection. As Congress tinkers with health insurance like a Jenga player on six espressos, a recent

Why We Cannot Allow the AHCA to Pull Our Lives Out From Under Us

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

I am Autistic and I have depended on Medicaid for my health care coverage for 23 years now. During those years, I have watched my coverage expand and shrink, depending on the political climate and the state I was living in at the time. (I have been a resident of Kentucky, Illinois, Minnesota, Idaho, and

New Laws Could Put Access on the Line at State and National Levels

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Imagine being Deaf and pregnant but not being able to discuss your concerns with your obstetrician for six months while waiting for your doctor’s office to get an ASL interpreter. Or what about having to wait two months for a local bank to acknowledge a letter you sent them about being unable to get your

My Paraprofessional Was Supposed to Help Me; Instead, She Bullied Me

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Every day, I’d come home from high school and tell my parents that I was being bullied. They didn’t realize how bad it was until one late April day in 10th grade. My teacher informed the class that we were two lessons ahead of everyone else. He asked us if we wanted to go down

The AHCA Would Put the Lives of Millions Like Me At Stake

Thursday, May 18, 2017

I am one of the millions of people across the country who have benefited from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). I have significant medical costs as a result of living with a rare genetic neurometabolic disorder, a primary immunodeficiency disease, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, and a genetic condition called Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. My

New Lawsuit Tackles the Notorious Inaccessibility of the NYC Subway System

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

New York City’s (NYC’s) public transportation system is notoriously inaccessible. Only about one in every five subway stations is wheelchair accessible, compared to about 90% of the subway system in Boston, where I currently live. Two class action lawsuits were recently filed against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). The lawsuits accuse the MTA of discriminating

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